Monthly Archives: April 2020

What is CRM?

This is a simple definition of CRM.

Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technology for managing all your company’s relationships and interactions with customers and potential customers. The goal is simple: Improve business relationships. A CRM system helps companies stay connected to customers, streamline processes, and improve profitability. When people talk about CRM, they are usually referring to a CRM system, a tool that helps with contact management, sales management, productivity, and more. A CRM solution helps you focus on your organization’s relationships with individual people — including customers, service users, colleagues, or suppliers — throughout your lifecycle with them, including finding new customers, winning their business, and providing support and additional services throughout the relationship.

Who is CRM for?

A CRM system gives everyone — from sales, customer service, business development, recruiting, marketing, or any other line of business — a better way to manage the external interactions and relationships that drive success. A CRM tool lets you store customer and prospect contact information, identify sales opportunities, record service issues, and manage marketing campaigns, all in one central location — and make information about every customer interaction available to anyone at your company who might need it. With visibility and easy access to data, it’s easier to collaborate and increase productivity. Everyone in your company can see how customers have been communicated with, what they’ve bought, when they last purchased, what they paid, and so much more. CRM can help companies of all sizes drive business growth, and it can be especially beneficial to a small business, where teams often need to find ways to do more with less.

Here’s why CRM matters to your business.

Gartner predicts that by 2021, CRM will be the single largest revenue area of spending in enterprise software. If your business is going to last, you know that you need a strategy for the future. You have targets for sales, business objectives, and profitability. But getting up-to-date, reliable information on your progress can be tricky. How do you translate the many streams of data coming in from sales, customer service, marketing, and social media monitoring into useful business information? A CRM system can give you a clear overview of your customers. You can see everything in one place — a simple, customizable dashboard that can tell you a customer’s previous history with you, the status of their orders, any outstanding customer service issues, and more.
You can even choose to include information from their public social media activity — their likes and dislikes, what they are saying and sharing about you or your competitors. Marketers can use a CRM solution to better understand the pipeline of sales or prospects coming in, making forecasting simpler and more accurate. You’ll have clear visibility of every opportunity or lead, showing you a clear path from inquiries to sales. Some of the biggest gains in productivity can come from moving beyond CRM as a sales and marketing tool, and embedding it in your business – from HR to customer services and supply-chain management. Though CRM systems have traditionally been used as sales and marketing tools, customer service teams are seeing great benefits in using them. Today’s customer might raise an issue in one channel — say, Twitter — and then switch to email or telephone to resolve it in private. A CRM platform lets you manage the inquiry across channels without losing track, and gives sales, service, and marketing a single view of the customer.

Running a business without CRM can cost you real money.

More administration means less time for everything else. An active sales team can generate a flood of data. Reps are out on the road talking to customers, meeting prospects, and finding out valuable information – but all too often this information gets stored in handwritten notes, laptops, or inside the heads of your salespeople.
Don’t make tracking and managing customer information harder than it needs to be. CRM ensures your data is in one place and can easily be updated by anyone, anytime.
Details can get lost, meetings are not followed up on promptly, and prioritizing customers can be a matter of guesswork rather than a rigorous exercise based on fact. And it can all be compounded if a key salesperson moves on. But it’s not just sales that suffers without CRM. Your customers may be contacting you on a range of different platforms including phone, email, or social media — asking questions, following up on orders, or contacting you about an issue. Without a common platform for customer interactions, communications can be missed or lost in the flood of information — leading to a slow or unsatisfactory response. Even if you do successfully collect all this data, you’re faced with the challenge of making sense of it. It can be difficult to extract intelligence. Reports can be hard to create and they can waste valuable selling time. Managers can lose sight of what their teams are up to, which means that they can’t offer the right support at the right time – while a lack of oversight can also result in a lack of accountability from the team.

What does a CRM system do?

A customer relationship management (CRM) solution helps you find new customers, win their business, and keep them happy by organizing customer and prospect information in a way that helps you build stronger relationships with them and grow your business faster. CRM systems start by collecting a customer’s website, email, telephone, social media data, and more, across multiple sources and channels. It may also automatically pull in other information, such as recent news about the company’s activity, and it can store personal details, such as a client’s personal preferences on communications. The CRM tool organizes this information to give you a complete record of individuals and companies overall, so you can better understand your relationship over time.
A CRM platform can also connect to other business apps that help you to develop customer relationships. CRM solutions today are more open and can integrate with your favorite business tools, such as document signing, accounting and billing, and surveys, so that information flows both ways to give you a true 360-degree view of your customer.
And a new generation of CRM goes one step further: Built-in intelligence automates administrative tasks, like data entry and lead or service case routing, so you can free up time for more valuable activities. Automatically generated insights help you understand your customers better, even predicting how they will feel and act so that you can prepare the right outreach.

Here’s how a CRM system can help your business today.

1. MAKE IMPROVEMENTS TO YOUR BOTTOM LINE.

Introducing a CRM platform has been shown to produce real results – including direct improvements to the bottom line. CRM applications have a proven track record of increasing:

A CRM system can help you identify and add new leads easily and quickly, and categorize them accurately. By focusing on the right leads, sales can prioritize the opportunities that will close deals, and marketing can identify leads that need more nurturing and prime them to become quality leads. With complete, accurate, centrally held information about clients and prospects, sales and marketing can focus their attention and energy on the right clients.

3. INCREASE REFERRALS FROM EXISTING CUSTOMERS.

By understanding your customers better, cross-selling and upselling opportunities become clear — giving you the chance to win new business from existing customers. With better visibility, you’ll also be able to keep your customers happy with better service. Happy customers are likely to become repeat customers, and repeat customers spend more — up to 33% more according to some studies.

4. OFFER BETTER CUSTOMER SUPPORT.

Today’s customers expect fast, personalized support, at any time of day or night. A CRM system can help you provide the high-quality service that customers are looking for. Your agents can quickly see what products customers have ordered, and they can get a record of every interaction so they can give customers the answers they need, fast.

5. IMPROVE PRODUCTS AND SERVICES.

A good CRM system will gather information from a huge variety of sources across your business and beyond. This gives you unprecedented insights into how your customers feel and what they are saying about your organization — so you can improve what you offer, spot problems early, and identify gaps.

Want to sell more, faster? Skip ahead.

Check out our interactive video and see how CRM with Salesforce can help you win customers — as well as find them and keep them happy.

Here’s what cloud-based CRM offers your business.

CRM and the cloud computing revolution have changed everything. Perhaps the most significant recent development in CRM systems has been the move into the cloud from on-premises CRM software. Freed from the need to install software on hundreds or thousands of desktop computers and mobile devices, organizations worldwide are discovering the benefits of moving data, software, and services into a secure online environment.

WORK FROM ANYWHERE.

Cloud-based CRM systems such as Salesforce (Learn more:What is Salesforce?) mean every user has the same information, all the time. Your sales teams out on the road can check data, update it instantly after a meeting, or work from anywhere. The same information is available to anyone who needs it, from the sales team to the customer service representatives.

REDUCE COSTS.

CRM can be quick and easy to implement. A cloud-based system doesn’t need special installation, and there’s no hardware to set up, keeping IT costs low and removing the headache of version control and update schedules. Generally, cloud-based CRM systems are priced on the number of users who access the system and the kinds of features you need. This can be very cost-effective in terms of capital outlay, and is also extremely flexible — enabling you to scale up and add more people as your business grows. Salesforce is flexible in terms of functionality, too — you’re not paying for any features that are not useful to you.

A CLOUD-BASED CRM PLATFORM OFFERS YOU:

  • Faster deployment
  • Automatic software updates
  • Cost-effectiveness and scalability
  • The ability to work from anywhere, on any device
  • Increased collaboration

What is cloud computing

What is cloud computing, in simple terms?

Cloud computing is the delivery of on-demand computing services — from applications to storage and processing power — typically over the internet and on a pay-as-you-go basis.

How does cloud computing work?

Rather than owning their own computing infrastructure or data centers, companies can rent access to anything from applications to storage from a cloud service provider.

One benefit of using cloud computing services is that firms can avoid the upfront cost and complexity of owning and maintaining their own IT infrastructure, and instead simply pay for what they use, when they use it.
In turn, providers of cloud computing services can benefit from significant economies of scale by delivering the same services to a wide range of customers.

What cloud computing services are available?

Cloud computing services cover a vast range of options now, from the basics of storage, networking, and processing power through to natural language processing and artificial intelligence as well as standard office applications. Pretty much any service that doesn’t require you to be physically close to the computer hardware that you are using can now be delivered via the cloud.

What are examples of cloud computing?

Cloud computing underpins a vast number of services. That includes consumer services like Gmail or the cloud back-up of the photos on your smartphone, though to the services which allow large enterprises to host all their data and run all of their applications in the cloud. Netflix relies on cloud computing services to run its its video streaming service and its other business systems too, and have a number of other organisations

Cloud computing is becoming the default option for many apps: software vendors are increasingly offering their applications as services over the internet rather than standalone products as they try to switch to a subscription model. However, there is a potential downside to cloud computing, in that it can also introduce new costs and new risks for companies using it

Why is it called cloud computing?

A fundamental concept behind cloud computing is that the location of the service, and many of the details such as the hardware or operating system on which it is running, are largely irrelevant to the user. It’s with this in mind that the metaphor of the cloud was borrowed from old telecoms network schematics, in which the public telephone network (and later the internet) was often represented as a cloud to denote that the just didn’t matter — it was just a cloud of stuff. This is an over-simplification of course; for many customers location of their services and data remains a key issue.

What is the history of cloud computing?

Cloud computing as a term has been around since the early 2000s, but the concept of computing-as-a-service has been around for much, much longer — as far back as the 1960s, when computer bureaus would allow companies to rent time on a mainframe, rather than have to buy one themselves.

These ‘time-sharing’ services were largely overtaken by the rise of the PC which made owning a computer much more affordable, and then in turn by the rise of corporate data centers where companies would store vast amounts of data

But the concept of renting access to computing power has resurfaced again and again — in the application service providers, utility computing, and grid computing of the late 1990s and early 2000s. This was followed by cloud computing, which really took hold with the emergence of software as a service and hyperscale cloud computing providers such as Amazon Web Services.

Cloud computing benefits

The exact benefits will vary according to the type of cloud service being used but, fundamentally, using cloud services means companies not having to buy or maintain their own computing infrastructure.

No more buying servers, updating applications or operating systems, or decommissioning and disposing of hardware or software when it is out of date, as it is all taken care of by the supplier. For commodity applications, such as email, it can make sense to switch to a cloud provider, rather than rely on in-house skills. A company that specializes in running and securing these services is likely to have better skills and more experienced staff than a small business could afford to hire, so cloud services may be able to deliver a more secure and efficient service to end users.

Using cloud services means companies can move faster on projects and test out concepts without lengthy procurement and big upfront costs, because firms only pay for the resources they consume. This concept of business agility is often mentioned by cloud advocates as a key benefit. The ability to spin up new services without the time and effort associated with traditional IT procurement should mean that is easier to get going with new applications faster. And if a new application turns out to be a wildly popular the elastic nature of the cloud means it is easier to scale it up fast.

For a company with an application that has big peaks in usage, for example that is only used at a particular time of the week or year, it may make financial sense to have it hosted in the cloud, rather than have dedicated hardware and software laying idle for much of the time. Moving to a cloud hosted application for services like email or CRM could remove a burden on internal IT staff, and if such applications don’t generate much competitive advantage, there will be little other impact. Moving to a services model also moves spending from capex to opex, which may be useful for some companies.

Cloud computing advantages and disadvantages

Cloud computing is not necessarily cheaper than other forms of computing, just as renting is not always cheaper than buying in the long term. If an application has a regular and predictable requirement for computing services it may be more economical to provide that service in-house.

Some companies may be reluctant to host sensitive data in a service that is also used by rivals. Moving to a SaaS application may also mean you are using the same applications as a rival, which may make it hard to create any competitive advantage if that application is core to your business.

While it may be easy to start using a new cloud application, migrating existing data or apps to the cloud may be much more complicated and expensive. And it seems there is now something of a shortage in cloud skills with staff with DevOps and multi-cloud monitoring and management knowledge in particularly short supply.

In one recent report a significant proportion of experienced cloud users said that they thought upfront migration costsultimately outweigh the long-term savings created by IaaS.

And of course, you can only access your applications if you have an internet connection.

What is cloud computing adoption doing to IT budgets?

Cloud computing tends to shift spending from capital expenditure (CapEx) to operating expenditure (OpEx) as companies buy computing as a service rather than in the form of physical servers. This may allow companies to avoid large increases in IT spending which would traditionally be seen with new projects; using the cloud to make room in the budget may be easier than going to the CFO and looking for more money.

“CIOs are increasingly turning to cloud infrastructure and services in order to increase flexibility and relieve pressure on capital budgets,” notes ZDNet’s survey of IT budget predictions. Of course, this doesn’t mean that cloud computing is always or necessarily cheaper that keeping applications in house; for applications with a predictable and stable demand for computing power may be cheaper (from a processing power point of view at least) to keep in-house.

How do you build a business case for cloud computing?

To build a business case for moving systems to the cloud you first need to understand what your existing infrastructure actually costs. There’s a lot to factor in: obvious things like the cost of running a data centers, and extras such as leased lines. The cost of physical hardware — servers and details of specifications like CPUs, cores and RAM, plus the cost of storage. You’ll also need to calculate the cost of applications — whether you plan to dump them, re-hosting them in the cloud unchanged, completely rebuilding them for the cloud or buying an entirely new SaaS package each option will have different cost implications. The cloud business case also needs to include people costs (often second only to the infrastructure costs) and more nebulous concepts like the benefit of being able to provide new services faster. Any cloud business case should also factor in the potential downsides, including the risk of being locked into one vendor for your tech infrastructure.

Cloud computing adoption

It’s hard to get figures on how companies are adopting cloud services although the market is clearly growing rapidly. One set of research suggests that around 12% of businesses consider themselves to be ‘cloud-first’ organisations, and about a third run some kind of workloads in the cloud — while a quarter of firms insist they will never move on-demand.

However, it may be that figures on adoption of cloud depend on who you talk to inside an organisation. Not all cloud spending will be driven centrally by the CIO: cloud services are relatively easy to sign up for, so business managers can start using them, and pay out of their own budget, without needing to inform the IT department. This can enable businesses to move faster but also can create security risks if the use of apps is not managed.

Adoption will also vary by application: cloud-based email — is much easier to adopt than a new finance system for example. Research by Spiceworks suggests that companies are planning to invest in cloud-based communications and collaboration tools and back-up and disaster recovery, but are less likely to be investing in supply chain management.

What about cloud computing security?

Certainly many companies remain concerned about the security of cloud services, although breaches of security are rare. How secure you consider cloud computing to be will largely depend on how secure your existing systems are. In-house systems managed by a team with many other things to worry about are likely to be more leaky than systems monitored by a cloud provider’s engineers dedicated to protecting that infrastructure.

However, concerns do remain about security, especially for companies moving their data between many cloud services, which has leading to growth in cloud security tools, which monitor data moving to and from the cloud and between cloud platforms. These tools can identify fraudulent use of data in the cloud, unauthorised downloads, and malware. There is a financial and performance impact however: these tools can reduce the return on investment of the cloud by five to 10% , and impact performance by five to 15% . The country of origin of cloud services is also worrying some organisations (see Is geography irrelevant when it comes to cloud computing? below)

What is public cloud?

Public cloud is the classic cloud computing model, where users can access a large pool of computing power over the internet (whether that is IaaS, PaaS, or SaaS). One of the significant benefits here is the ability to rapidly scale a service. The cloud computing suppliers have vast amounts of computing power, which they share out between a large number of customers — the ‘multi-tenant’ architecture. Their huge scale means they have enough spare capacity that they can easily cope if any particular customer needs more resources, which is why it is often used for less-sensitive applications that demand a varying amount of resources.

gartnercloud.png
Image: Gartner

What is private cloud?

Private cloud allows organizations to benefit from the some of the advantages of public cloud — but without the concerns about relinquishing control over data and services, because it is tucked away behind the corporate firewall. Companies can control exactly where their data is being held and can build the infrastructure in a way they want — largely for IaaS or PaaS projects — to give developers access to a pool of computing power that scales on-demand without putting security at risk. However, that additional security comes at a cost, as few companies will have the scale of AWS, Microsoft or Google, which means they will not be able to create the same economies of scale. Still, for companies that require additional security, private cloud may be a useful stepping stone, helping them to understand cloud services or rebuild internal applications for the cloud, before shifting them into the public cloud.

What is hybrid cloud?

Hybrid cloud is perhaps where everyone is in reality: a bit of this, a bit of that. Some data in the public cloud, some projects in private cloud, multiple vendors and different levels of cloud usage. According to research by TechRepublic, the main reasons for choosing hybrid cloud include disaster recovery planning and the desire to avoid hardware costs when expanding their existing data center.

Cloud computing migration costs

For start-ups who plan to run all their systems in the cloud getting started is pretty simple. But the majority of companies it is not so simple: with existing applications and data they need to work out which systems are best left running as they, and which to start moving them to cloud infrastructure. This is a potentially risky and expensive move, and migrating to the cloud could cost companies more if they underestimate the scale of such projects.

A survey of 500 businesses that were early cloud adopters found that the need to rewrite applications to optimise them for the cloud was one of the biggest costs, especially if the apps were complex or customised. A third of those surveyed said cited high fees for passing data between systems as a challenge in moving their mission-critical applications.

The report by Forrester also found that the skills required for migration are both difficult and expensive to find — and that even when organisations could find the right people they risked them being stolen away by cloud computing vendors with deep pockets. One third of those surveyed said their software database license costs drastically increased if they moved applications.

Beyond this the majority also remained worried about the performance of critical apps and one in three cited this as a reason for not moving some critical applications.

Is geography irrelevant when it comes to cloud computing?

Actually it turns out that is where the cloud really does matter; indeed geopolitics is forcing significant changes on cloud computing user and vendors. Firstly, there is the issue of latency: if the application is coming from a data center on the other side of the planet, or on the other side of a congested network, then you may find it sluggish compared to a local connection. That’s the latency problem.

Secondly, there is the issue of data sovereignty. Many companies — particularly in Europe — have to worry about where their data is being processed and stored. European companies are worried that, for example, if their customer data is being stored in data centers in the US or (owned by US companies) it could be accessed by US law enforcement. As a result the big cloud vendors have been building out a regional data center network so that organizations can keep their data in their own region.

In Germany, Microsoft has gone one step further, offering its Azure cloud services from two data centers, which have been set up to make it much harder for US authorities — and others — to demand access to the customer data stored there. The customer data in the data centers is under the control of an independent German company which acts as a “data trustee”, and Microsoft cannot access data at the sites without the permission of customers or the data trustee. Expect to see cloud vendors opening more data centers around the world to cater to customers with requirements to keep data in specific locations.

And regulation of cloud computing varies widely elsewhere across the world: for example AWS recently sold a chunk of its cloud infrastructure in China to its local partner because of China’s strict tech regulations. Since then AWS has opened a second China (Ningxia) Region, operated by Ningxia Western Cloud Data Technology.


Cloud security is another issue; the UK government’s cyber security agency has warned that government agencies need to consider the country of origin when it comes to adding cloud services into their supply chains. While it was warning about antivirus software in particular, the issue is the same for other types of services too.

Consultants Accenture have warned that ‘digital fragmentation‘ is the result as different countries enact legislation to protect privacy and improve cyber security. While the aims of the laws is laudable, the impact is to raise costs for businesses. Three quarters of the 400 CIOs and CTOs surveyed expect to exit a geographic market, delay their market-entry plans or abandon market-entry plans in the next three years as a result of increased barriers to globalization.

More than half of the business leaders surveyed believe that the increasing barriers to globalization will compromise their ability to: use or provide cloud-based services (cited by 54% of respondents, versus 14% that disagree); use or provide data and analytics services across national markets (54% versus 15% ); and operate effectively across different national IT standards (58% versus 18%).

Over half said these increasing barriers will force their companies to rethink their: global IT architectures (cited by 60%) physical IT location strategy (52%); cybersecurity strategy and capabilities (51%); relationship with local and global IT suppliers (50%); and geographic strategy for IT talent (50%).

What is Web Hosting?

Web hosting is a service that allows organizations and individuals to post a website or web page onto the Internet. A web host, or web hosting service provider, is a business that provides the technologies and services needed for the website or webpage to be viewed in the Internet. Websites are hosted, or stored, on special computers called servers. When Internet users want to view your website, all they need to do is type your website address or domain into their browser. Their computer will then connect to your server and your webpages will be delivered to them through the browser.

 

Most hosting companies require that you own your domain in order to host with them. If you do not have a domain, the hosting companies will help you purchase one.

Here are some features you should be expecting from your hosting provider:

Email Accounts As mentioned earlier, most hosting providers require users to have their own domain name. With a domain name (e.g. www.yourwebsite.com) and email account features provided by your hosting company, you can create domain email accounts (e.g. [email protected]).
FTP Access The use of FTP lets you upload files from your local computer to your web server. If you build your website using your own HTML files, you can transfer the files from your computer to the web server through FTP, allowing your website to be accessed through the internet.
WordPress Support WordPress is an online website creation tool. It is a powerful blogging and website content management system, which is a convenient way to create and manage website. WordPress powers over 25% of websites on the internet. Most hosting providers will tell you right away if their plans are WordPress-compatible or not. The simple requirements for hosting your WordPress websites include: PHP version 7 or greater; MySQL version 5.6 or greater.

 

If you decide to create and host your website with Website.com,

in addition to access to the drag and drop site builder, you can get a custom domain, email addresses, and web hosting all

bundled into one subscription.
If you would rather build your website through coding or a CMS tool like WordPress, we’ve handpicked a few hosting providers based on their features and price:

 

How can my online business benefit from a web hosting service?
In order to publish your website online, your business website requires a web hosting service. However, a web host gives business owners more than just web hosting services! For example, web hosting firms typically employ in-house technicians to make sure their clients’ websites are up and running 24/7. Plus, when website owners are in need of help or troubleshooting (e.g. script debutting, email not able to send/receive, domain name renewal, and more), the web host’s in-house support are the go-to people. A professional web hosting service ensures a hassle-free experience for business owners, so they can efficiently focus their time and effort on their businesses.

Car Insurance

Those who are not aware about the concept of insurance might find car insurance a bit difficult to understand. Some people take it as an investment. Car insurance is not exactly an investment because it does not yield returns like a fixed deposit or a mutual fund. However, it is an important part of your financial plan as it prevents financial losses in cases like a car accident.

Car insurance is based on the simple concept of risk sharing. You pay a premium to an insurance company which promises to pay for the car repairs as per the terms and conditions of the policy.


The following sections will help you to understand important points about car insurance and act as a guide to buy best comprehensive car insurance or zero depreciation car insurance online. Also check out the frequently asked questions section related to car policy.

Buy/Renew Car Insurance Online in Simple Steps

Buying or renewing your car insurance online is a simple, easy, and convenient process. You can buy/renew your car insurance policy within minutes by following the steps mentioned below

Best cloud storage of 2020 Online: free and paid

Businesses and consumers are increasingly reliant on cloud based storage solutions instead of in-house, on-premise local storage hardware Your files are stored in the cloud, which is a simplified view of what is essentially someone else’s infrastructure (data center, server, hard drive, connectivity etc)..

 

Ever since Amazon popularised storage online with S3 (Simple Storage Service), 13 years ago, Google data shows that interest for “Cloud Storage” alone has increased by 40x over the past decade. So much so that people less frequently refer to it as “online storage”


 

Given the multitude of cloud storage providers out there, one has to wisely choose a provider who will offer the maximum amount of low-cost storage and bandwidth, while still keeping your data safe

 

This list represents our top picks for cloud storage: most offer a free tier allowing you to see if they’re right for you before handing over any hard-earned cash. And it’s iDrive that leads the way thanks to how fast, thorough and easy to use it is.

1. IDrive cloud storage

IDrive offers continuous syncing of your files, even those on network drives. The web interface supports sharing files by email, Facebook and Twitter. Cautious or click-happy users will be pleased to hear that files deleted from your computer are not automatically deleted from the server, so there’s less danger of removing something important by accident. Up to 30 previous versions of all files backed to your account are retained.

 

Another thing to note is that IT admins have access to IDrive Thin Client application, which allows them to backup/restore, manage settings, and more for all their connected computers via a centralized dashboard

 

For photos, you have a neat facial recognition feature that helps you to automatically organize them as well as syncing them across all your linked devices. IDrive also offers IDrive Express which sends you a physical hard disk drive if you lose all your data, allowing for the swift restoration of all your backed up files. That applies to the newly introduced disk image backup feature

 

A business version exists and offers priority support, single sign-on as well as unlimited users and server backup. Furthermore, IDrive Cloud, an enterprise-class cloud object storage is also available.

 

2.Mega cloud storage

With an insanely generous free tier and a simple drag-and-drop interface, New Zealand-based Mega is one of the cloud storage heavyweights. There’s a handy mobile app to allow you to upload files and photos, as well as sync clients with desktop machines. The company also has business tailored plans.

 

Mega claims that all data stored in its cloud is encrypted on your device before it reaches the firm’s servers. As the company has released the source code to its sync client, experts can check that there are no vulnerabilities

 

Price: 50GB free. 400GB for $6 a month (£4.50, €4.99, around AU$7.50). 2TB for $12 a month (£9, €9.99, around AU$16). 8TB for $23 a month (£17, €19.99, around AU$30). 16TB for $35 a month (£26, €29.99, around AU$46).

 

3.Google Drive cloud storage

Google Drive is a natural choice for owners of Android devices as it’s already integrated, but users of other platforms may appreciate the generous free storage too. You can also store high definition photos on your mobile phone with companion app Google Photos, and make use of Google’s own office suite (now known as G Suite). Also, upgrading to paid Google Drive plans is now called Google One (although it might not yet be available, depending on the region).

 

Downsides include the fact that the web interface isn’t very easy-to-use, although Windows and Mac users can download a desktop app to drag-and-drop files easily.

 

Price: 15GB free. 100GB for $1.99 a month (£1.59, around AU$2.50). 200GB for $2.99 a month (£2.35, around AU$4.10). 2TB for $9.99 a month (£8, around AU$13). 10TB for $99.99 a month (£74, around AU$130). 20TB for $199.99 a month (£148, around AU$260). 30TB for $299.99 a month (£236, around AU$426).

 

4.iCloud cloud storage

If you want to back up your iPhone to iCloud, you’ll need more than the free 5GB allowance Apple gives you, but compared to rivals iCloud prices are very reasonable.

 

The Mac Finder app integrates iCloud Drive, where you can store any files you wish. Documents created in the iWork office suite are also saved to iCloud and can sync across your devices. Windows users can also sync their files with iCloud Drive using the official client, and access the iWork apps on the iCloud website

 

Price: 5GB free. 50GB for $0.99 a month (£0.79, AU$1.49). 200GB for $2.99 (£2.24, AU$4). 2TB for $9.99 (£8, AU$13)

 

5.OneDrive cloud storage

OneDrive is integrated into Windows 10’s File Explorer. You don’t have to download an additional app – it’s there to use out of the box, which is obviously very convenient for those who have made the jump to Microsoft’s newest operating system.


 

Microsoft’s Photos app can also use OneDrive to sync pictures across all your devices. As of late March, Autodesk AutoCAD has been integrated with OneDrive which is good news for anyone using the software’s drafting tools. In addition, you have a feature called Personal Vault, which gives you an added layer of protection. There’s an app for Android and iOS devices, and there’s even one in the App Store for Mac users (although it has received mixed reviews).

 

Price: 5GB free. 100GB for $1.99 a month (£1.50, around AU$2.9). 1TB for $7 a month (£5.99, around AU$11). Unlimited (as part of Onedrive for Business) for $10 a month (£7.99, around AU$14)

Data Analytics Courses

What is Data Analytics?

Data science is an integral part of almost every part of your life. Has your bank offered new products and services? Those were based on data analysis. Have you recently noticed a change in your grocery store’s layout? The decision was probably spurred by data analysis. Business heading in a new direction? That’s right. Data analysis. Data analytics is a branch of data science that handles raw data analytics. A data analyst is a bit like a detective. Data flows into an organization through many different means and it’s up to the data analyst to wrangle it and shape it into something ready to provide insight. Because data is such a large part of decision making across nearly all fields, data analytics is a vital skill.

Learn Data Analytics

Data analytics is often a step to full-fledged data scientist. You’ll gain skills in statistics, algorithms, machine learning, and visualization. It requires a lot of skill and a little intuition about how and where to find the answers an organization needs. Bolstering your skills in analytics is a great way to get into this field and sets you up to explore insights and build experience in business intelligence. The data sets may not be clean, not yet, but once a data analyst gets hold of them, they can provide answers critical to a business or organization’s next steps.

Data Analytics Certifications and Courses

Getting new training in Data Analytics is simple through edX.org. It partners with leading institutions, big names in the industry of data, to offer you courses designed to prepare you for your career in data analytics and beyond. The University of Adelaide, for example, offers an introductory course in Big Data Analytics that flows neatly into a micro-masters degree. Columbia combines machine learning and analytics with a course on Machine Learning and Data Science. You can also find courses on Business Analytics (Wharton) and Applied Data Analytics (Microsoft.) IBM offers a course in Predictive Analytics, which is so important for today’s business. Rochester Institute of Technology introduces data analytics and visualization for the healthcare sector. Berkeley can help get you on the road to data-driven marketing with analytics tools for marketing. Whatever field you’re in, you can find a course designed around data management, data visualization, and decision making.

Ignite a Career in Data Analytics


Programming languages? Check. Computer science? Check. Data management? Now, check. Your career in data analysis is just around the corner. Learn everything you need to know about wrangling data, from data warehouses to relational databases to real-time, advanced analytics. Your expertise can help provide direction and insight for your organization and ensure that data quality never causes a decision misfire. Help make sense of the volumes of data humans produce and build a reliable career.

Google Adwords in digital Marketing

Google AdWords is a marketplace where companies pay to have their website ranked right with the top organic search results, based on keywords. The basic gist is, you select to promote your brand based on keywords. A keyword is a word or phrase the user searches for, who then sees your ad. Your ads will only show up for the keywords you pick. Google counts the clicks on your ads and charges you for each click. They also count impressions, which is simply the number that tells you how often your ad has already been shown when the users searched for that keyword. If you divide clicks by impressions, you get the click-through-rate or CTR. This is the percentage of users who land on your advertised page, because they clicked on your ad.

Consider Google AdWords to be an auction house. You set a budget and a bid. The bid sets how much you are willing to pay per click. If your maximum bid is $2, Google will only show your ad to people, if other aren’t bidding more on average. Google doesn’t just want to show people the ads by the highest bidder – they could still be horrible ads. They care about their users so much that they’d rather show them a more relevant and better ad by someone who pays less. Therefore − Quality ads + good bid = win!

Create a Google AdWords Account

To create a Google AdWords account, visit − www.adwords.google.com/. From there you’ll create your account, and set up your first campaign. Here are the steps −

Step 1

Select your campaign type and name.

Step 2

Choose the geographic location where you’d like ads to show.

Step 3

Choose your “bid strategy,” and set your daily budget. Change the default “Bid strategy” to “I’ll manually set my bids for clicks”. This gives you more control and will help you learn AdWords at a greater level of understanding.

Step 4

Create your first ad group, and write your first ad. More people click on ads when the headline includes the keyword they’re searching on. So use your keywords in your headline when you can.

You’re limited to 25 characters here, so for some search terms, you’ll need to use abbreviations or shorter synonyms. Here’s the short version of your ad template −

  • Headline: Up to 25 characters of text
  • 2nd line: Up to 35 characters
  • 3rd line: Up to 35 characters
  • 4th line: Your display URL

Step 5

Insert your keywords into the keyword field in your account. Paste in your keywords. Start with just one set, and add plus signs (+), brackets ([ ]), and quotes (“ “) to see precisely how many searches of each type you’ll get.

Step 6


Set your maximum cost-per-click. Set your maximum price-per-click (called your “default bid”). However, realize this: Every keyword is theoretically a different market, which means that each of your major keywords will need a bid price of its own. Google will let you set individual bids for each keyword later.

Step 7

Enter your billing information and Voila!